How to Get Rid of Mold on Indoor Plant Soil

mold in houseplants

Mold in houseplant soil is a source of tremendous frustration for indoor plant enthusiasts. While mold in houseplant soil isn’t harmful to your plant, it can indicate an issue with how you’re caring for it. Fortunately, there’s no need to be concerned; mold in indoor plant soil is usually harmless, and it’s easy to get rid of using a few simple and effective procedures.

To get rid of mold, repot the plant – 

If you’re not ready to try to solve the mold problem on your own, you might want to just get rid of it all at once. You can repot the plant in new, sterile soil, ensuring that the previous, contaminated soil is no longer a factor. Simply take your houseplant from its pot, clean the container (you can even give it a small fungicide spray), and refill the container with fresh sterile soil. Alternatively, soak the container for 10 minutes in a mix of 9 parts water and 1 part liquid bleach to totally eradicate any leftover mold spores. After that, simply rinse the pot with water and standard dishwashing liquid.

To get rid of mold spores, dry off your potting soil in direct sunlight – 

Because mold thrives in damp soil, you must make sure that your houseplants don’t get too wet on a regular basis. Drying out the soil is an excellent first step – and you can do it with natural sunlight. There are two ways to use sunlight to dry out your potting soil. The first method is to simply transfer your plant outside into a sunny place where the sun’s rays can do their job. Another option is to carefully remove the plant from its container and then spread the soil out in a brightly lit area. If your houseplant is sensitive to direct sunlight, this is a fantastic option.

Spray a fungicide on the plant to remove mold – 

If the plant is infected with mold, it will continue to pollute the soil it grows in, especially if it is damp all of the time. A decent first step is to remove the mold by hand. Mold is normally only found on the soil’s surface, so gently scoop the infected dirt out of the pot’s top layer. After that, remove the mold from the plant itself. You can wipe the plant down with a moist dish towel or cloth a few times until mold is no longer visible. The next step is to apply a fungicide to the plant to further protect it and the soil.

Use a natural anti-fungal in the soil of your houseplants – 

To keep mold and fungus at bay, soil sometimes needs a helping hand. It can be difficult if you live in a cold or damp climate, but you can alleviate the problem by simply adding a natural anti-fungal to the soil. What natural antifungal remedies are available to you? Cinnamon, apple cider vinegar, and baking soda are all excellent natural antifungal choices. Your houseplant will not be harmed by any of these products. 

To avoid mold contamination, quickly repot new houseplants in sterile soil – 

You’ll be anxious to get fresh houseplants into their new placements, decorating and providing a splash of color to your home, whether you buy them or receive them as presents. Mold spores may have already infested the soil in which your new plant or seedling has been developing. You can repot the new plant into fresh, sterile soil right away to avoid introducing mold to the rest of your plants or a worsening case of mold contamination. Allowing the potentially contaminated soil to come into contact with your other plants is not a good idea.